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Posts Tagged ‘gnu

Supercomputers by operating system: Linux rules the roost!

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From the BBC: In Graphics: Supercomputing superpowers.
supercomputers by OS, LINUX RULES!
Supercomputer graph, by operating system: Linux RULES THE ROOST!

a surprise? I think not….

The data used to generate the interactive treemap visualisation come from a draft of the June 2010 TOP500 Supercomputing list. This ranks most of the world’s fastest supercomputers twice a year. There may be minor differences between this list and the final published list.

The graphic allows you to see the visualise the list by the speed of each machine; the operating systems used; what it is used for; the country where it is based; the maker of the silicon chips used to build the machine and the manufacturer of the super computer.

The maps were produced using the Prefuse Flare software, developed by the University of California Berkeley.

Hmmmm…Apple’s Macs didn’t even make the list….

Written by tonybaldwin

May 31, 2010 at 8:13 am

screenshot: Paula Toller

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Paula Toller of Kid Abelha

linda…

Written by tonybaldwin

May 19, 2010 at 9:01 pm

Convert an .html file to .pdf in gnu/linux

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There are various options for converting .html files to .pdf in a gnu/linux operating system. Your choice of methods will depend on the complexity of the file you wish to convert, and your familiarity with the tools a gnu/linux system provides.

What you’ll need:

  • Gnu/linux operating system
  • Html file
  • Web browser

Optional:

  • Openoffice.org office suite
  • wget
  • html2ps
  • ps2pdf

Simply “Print to file”
One very simple option for creating a .pdf file from an .html file is to simply open the file in your browser, and choose, print. When the print dialog arises, choose “Print to File”, and indicate “PDF”. This will write the html file out to pdf format.
html to pdf conversion: print to file
Here is a pdf of this article generated in this fashion: converthtml2pdfgnulinux.pdf
OpenOffice.org

“Print to File” works well for basic html files with simple text and some images. If the html file in question has more complex formatting, this option may not always produce the best results. Luckily, other options exist.

Save the html file to your computer (if you haven’t already done so), and open it with OpenOffice.org‘s html editor (ooweb). Then simply go to the “File” menu, and choose “Export”. OpenOffice.org will then offer you the usual options for saving a file, such as choosing where to save it, and what title to give the file, and, preso-magico, will produce a .pdf file from your .html file.

Command Line

Of course, no linux how to article would be complete without instructions on how to accomplish your task using only the magical Bash command line interface. For those so inclined, then, the following is a complete process for acquiring an .html file and converting it to a .pdf file. In order to proceed with this method, the following software must be installed on the your computer: wget, html2ps, and ps2pdf. These programs are either already a part of most gnu/linux distributions, by default, or can be easily acquired with your favorite package manager (apt, yum, pacman, portage, etc.)

First, let’s save the file to your computer:
wget http://www.somesite.com/yourfile.html

Next, let’s convert the .html file to a postscript or .ps file:
html2ps yourfile.html > yourfile.ps

Then, we’ll convert the postscript file, finally, to a .pdf file:
ps2pdf yourfile.ps

Voila!
You should now have “yourfile.pdf”.

This could, of course, all be scripted.

#!/bin/bash

# convert webpages to pdf files
# get url
echo "Enter the url of the page to be converted:"
read page
#download page
wget $page

file=$(basename $page)
#convert to postscript
html2ps $file > $file.ps
#convert to pdf
ps2pdf $file.ps
#clean up extraneous files
rm -f $file
rm -f $file.ps
#clean up file name
rename "s/.html.pdf/.pdf/g" *.pdf

echo "done"

exit

Here is a pdf of this article, generated via this command line method: convertweb2pdflinux.pdf
Notice, it is different from the above pdf created with “Print to file”. One difference, which, depending on your goals, may be either advantageous or undesired, is that text in this file can be selected and copied, which is not true of the first file.

XHTML2PDF

In many cases, you may wish to create a pdf file from a complex .html or .xhtml file that includes .css (cascading style sheet) or other elements, that will not render in the above methods in such a manner as to produce a file that appears as it does on the Internet.

For those cases, there is a program called xhtml2pdf. This program is not as likely to be a part of most gnu/linux distributions by default, nor available from said distributions’ repositories. As such, you may to have to download and install it by hand. Thankfully, the site for this program is easily enough found at http://www.xhtml2pdf.com/, and, of course, the program is free, open source software.

And, of course, here is a pdf of this article generated with xhtml2pdf: xhtml2pdfconversion.pdf

There’s more!

Yet other methods exist for generating .pdf file from .html files, of course, and an attempt to compile an exhaustive list, with instructions for each, would be beyond the scope of this article.

Written by tonybaldwin

May 18, 2010 at 3:00 pm

Posted in free software, gnu/linux

Tagged with , , , , ,

Convert an .html file to .pdf in gnu/linux

leave a comment »

There are various options for converting .html files to .pdf in a gnu/linux operating system. Your choice of methods will depend on the complexity of the file you wish to convert, and your familiarity with the tools a gnu/linux system provides.

What you’ll need:

  • Gnu/linux operating system
  • Html file
  • Web browser

Optional:

  • Openoffice.org office suite
  • wget
  • html2ps
  • ps2pdf

Simply “Print to file”
One very simple option for creating a .pdf file from an .html file is to simply open the file in your browser, and choose, print. When the print dialog arises, choose “Print to File”, and indicate “PDF”. This will write the html file out to pdf format.
html to pdf conversion: print to file

Here is a pdf of this article generated in this fashion: converthtml2pdfgnulinux.pdf

OpenOffice.org

“Print to File” works well for basic html files with simple text and some images. If the html file in question has more complex formatting, this option may not always produce the best results. Luckily, other options exist.

Save the html file to your computer (if you haven’t already done so), and open it with OpenOffice.org‘s html editor (ooweb). Then simply go to the “File” menu, and choose “Export”. OpenOffice.org will then offer you the usual options for saving a file, such as choosing where to save it, and what title to give the file, and, preso-magico, will produce a .pdf file from your .html file.

Command Line

Of course, no linux how to article would be complete without instructions on how to accomplish your task using only the magical Bash command line interface. For those so inclined, then, the following is a complete process for acquiring an .html file and converting it to a .pdf file. In order to proceed with this method, the following software must be installed on the your computer: wget, html2ps, and ps2pdf. These programs are either already a part of most gnu/linux distributions, by default, or can be easily acquired with your favorite package manager (apt, yum, pacman, portage, etc.)

First, let’s save the file to your computer:
wget http://www.somesite.com/yourfile.html

Next, let’s convert the .html file to a postscript or .ps file:
html2ps yourfile.html > yourfile.ps

Then, we’ll convert the postscript file, finally, to a .pdf file:
ps2pdf yourfile.ps

Voila!
You should now have “yourfile.pdf”.

This could, of course, all be scripted.

#!/bin/bash

# convert webpages to pdf files
# get url
echo "Enter the url of the page to be converted:"
read page
#download page
wget $page

file=$(basename $page)
#convert to postscript
html2ps $file > $file.ps
#convert to pdf
ps2pdf $file.ps
#clean up extraneous files
rm -f $file
rm -f $file.ps
#clean up file name
rename "s/.html.pdf/.pdf/g" *.pdf

echo "done"

exit

Here is a pdf of this article, generated via this command line method: convertweb2pdflinux.pdf
Notice, it is different from the above pdf created with “Print to file”. One difference, which, depending on your goals, may be either advantageous or undesired, is that text in this file can be selected and copied, which is not true of the first file.

XHTML2PDF

In many cases, you may wish to create a pdf file from a complex .html or .xhtml file that includes .css (cascading style sheet) or other elements, that will not render in the above methods in such a manner as to produce a file that appears as it does on the Internet.

For those cases, there is a program called xhtml2pdf. This program is not as likely to be a part of most gnu/linux distributions by default, nor available from said distributions’ repositories. As such, you may to have to download and install it by hand. Thankfully, the site for this program is easily enough found at http://www.xhtml2pdf.com/, and, of course, the program is free, open source software.

And, of course, here is a pdf of this article generated with xhtml2pdf: xhtml2pdfconversion.pdf

There’s more!

Yet other methods exist for generating .pdf file from .html files, of course, and an attempt to compile an exhaustive list, with instructions for each, would be beyond the scope of this article.

Written by tonybaldwin

May 18, 2010 at 8:01 am

Tux Trans: Linux for Translators released today!

with one comment

This morning I awoke to find announcement in my inbox of the release of Tux Trans, a gnu/linux distribution, based on Ubuntu Linux.

TuxTrans - gnu/linux for translators

Tuxtrans includes all of the software any professional needs for their usual office and communications needs, including web browsers, e-mail clients, VoIP and chat, the fully featured OpenOffice office suite (word processing, spreadsheets, etc.), tools for multimedia, pdf file manipulation, creation, and other desktop publication tools, plus additional programs specifically useful to translators, including CAT (Computer Aided Translation) software, text aligment tools, software localization, tools, even video subtitling tools, such as:

With these tools, any professional translator is fully equipped to conquer the industry. Seriously.
The underlying system, Ubuntu gnu/Linux, of course, is a solid, fully featured, and very popular gnu/linux distrubtion (I have Ubuntu on my laptop and my netbook, but Debian on my desktops).
Tuxtrans can be tried without affecting your current system, being a LiveCD distrubtion (it can run from a CDRom, without being installed to or effecting your hard drive, while, installation is, of course, an option once you’ve tried it).

Kudos to Peter Sandrini for putting this all together!

Written by tonybaldwin

May 5, 2010 at 4:06 am

Linux Inside! 50 place you didn't know Linux was running.

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I found this article interesting.

Among gnu/linux users listed are included:

  • various US and foreign government agencies, including the French Parliament, Cuba, Spain, the US Postal Service, US Dept. of Defense and Navy, etc.
  • Many large companies (you knew about IBm, Dell and Google, of course, but how about Burlington Coat Factory, Amazon.com, Omaha Steaks, and Virgin Airlines?)
  • a myriad school systems

Likely, you are using services running on gnu/linux, somewhere, whether you knew it or not!


posted with Xpostulate

Written by tonybaldwin

April 12, 2010 at 7:26 am